"The gray space is carved directly into a grassy hillside, evoking an open wound. In this way, the Munich 1972 Massacre Memorial, set to open on Sept. 6, is emblematic of the pain that has endured for many since that year’s Olympic Games, when 11 members of the Israeli team and one German police officer were killed by members of the Palestinian group Black September."

This week not only marks the forty-fifth anniversary of the Munich Massacre of eleven Israeli athletes but also the beginning of our documentary film project looking at how that day in September changed five women’s lives forever. 

From the NY Times:

"Among the most poignant elements of the exhibition are the personal effects, one for each victim, that were photographed for the memorial. Werner Karg, an official in the Bavarian ministry of culture, said it was unfortunate that haunting images of masked terrorists were more prominent in the public consciousness today than the memories, and the faces, of the victims. The memorial, he said, could help change that."

This film will be a Canada-Dutch co-production in collaboration with Windmill Film with the support of the Canadian Media Fund and will be broadcast in Canada on documentary channel in English and Radio Canada in French. 

Stay tuned as we bring you coverage of how this historic event now forty-five years later is helping to make amends. Sign up to stay connected. 

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Ankie Spitzer

Ankie Spitzer

Marianne Gladnikoff

Marianne Gladnikoff

Esther Roth-Shahamarov

Esther Roth-Shahamarov